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That’s what we’re here for! We have the only certified CBD nurse in the state of Kansas dedicated to helping you.

That’s what we’re here for! We have the only certified CBD nurse in the state of Kansas dedicated to helping you.

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Buy CBD Topeka, KS

Buy CBD Topeka, KS
Where to buy quality CBD Oil in Topeka

The Topeka CBD Buying Process

Topeka CBD stores are not created equal. People in Topeka, KS can buy CBD online from N8 Essentials and have their CBD delivered in just a few days.

Learn About CBD

Learn about CBD in Topeka, Kansas. We’ll help explain the CBD laws and also the best way to buy CBD in Topeka.

N8 Essentials Offers CBD in Topeka

We’re one of the leading distributors of CBD oils and topical products in Topeka, KS. Learn more about what we have to offer.

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Experience the Topeka CBD Revolution

CBD has exploded in popularity in Topeka, Kansas over the past few years, thanks to its medical benefits and lack of psychoactive effects. CBD shows great potential for treating anxiety, pain, inflammation, seizures, sleeping disorders and neurological conditions. According to a 2017 study by the Hemp Business Journal, CBD sales in Topeka from products derived from hemp and marijuana more than tripled from 2014 to 2017. People in Topeka frequently are searching online for things like “CBD near me” or “where to buy CBD in Topeka, KS.”

CBD is one of over 100 cannabinoids produced by the marijuana plant, but unlike the majority of them – which are not known to possess major health benefits on their own – it is known to display nearly all of the medicinal and therapeutic properties of whole-plant cannabis.

With laws being altered throughout America to allow for medical marijuana use, however, the traditional stigma is rapidly dissipating, and we have to put much of that change down to CBD and its incredible array of benefits.

At N8 Essentials, we provide the Topeka community with fairly priced hemp oil extracts. We aim at providing and educating everyone about the benefits of Topeka CBD oil. Buy pure CBD oil in Topeka, KS; we are driven by the principles that extend far beyond the bottom line. It is our goal to provide the CBD oil in Topeka with the highest possible quality while contributing to the sustainability of the communities that we have the privilege of serving.

There are many places to buy CBD oil in Topeka, with or without a doctor’s prescription. Since CBD contains only trace amounts of THC, the psychoactive compound in marijuana, it’s legal in all 50 states. There are stores, gas stations and everyone in between selling CBD oil in Topeka, but they are not all the same…

Is CBD Legal in Topeka, KS?

Yes! CBD oil is legal in Topeka, Kansas and everywhere across the USA. The organically grown hemp plants that produce the cannabinoid (CBD) contain far below the legal limit of THC. THC is the part of marijuana that produces a psychoactive effect. Our CBD oil is made to give you full spectrum CBD benefits for the best overall health, without getting high. This is a popular way for Topeka, KS residents to treat many conditions like pain, anxiety and insomnia, legally. The federal government classifies CBD oil in Topeka as a dietary supplement as long as the THC content is below .03%. Recent legislation legalized a CBD oil called Epidiolex to treat Epilepsy. This is the first marijuana-derived medication approved by the FDA.

Topeka, KS CBD Production Infographic

Our Zero-THC phytocannabinoid-rich hemp extract (Topeka CBD) products have all cannabinoids and terpenes naturally found in hemp except Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This non-psychoactive product allows for the distribution of our hemp oil in Topeka, Kansas.

The extraction and purification process uses a proprietary and patented technology that preserves all the phytocannabinoids, terpenes, and plant lipids while eliminating unwanted THC and chlorophyll. Customers can customize our hemp-infused products to their desired potency and specifications.

What type of Topeka CBD should I purchase?

Most people in Topeka pick their CBD oil based on their preferred method of consumption. However, sublingual tinctures are the most effective because its effects are felt almost immediately. Also, in today’s Medical Cannabis Industry, Vaporizer Cartridges are the most popular and hottest selling product on the market, specially young adults who prefer vaporizing their CBD Oil.

Buy CBD Oil in Topeka, KS from N8 Essentials

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We provide the highest quality products so you are confident sharing them with your family and friends.

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CBD oil in Topeka can be taken in different forms to suit the preference and needs of its users. People seeking CBD oil benefits have a wide selection of options that are available in Topeka, KS.

History of CBD in Topeka

CBD first received national recognition in 2013, when CNN featured a documentary about Charlotte Figi, a little girl with a severe case of Dravet syndrome. When Charlotte was five years old, she was experiencing nearly 300 seizures a week and no treatments seemed to help control her seizures. Absolutely devastated, her family desperately searched for an alternative to conventional treatments. The entire world took notice of this incident, and research began for the potential medical CBD benefits. Many studies have generated positive results, which has made the demand for the supplement skyrocket.

Although CBD was discovered in the 1940s, research in Topeka, Kansas has been slow due to the legal status of cannabis over the last century. This past decade however, CBD has eliminated its negative stigma of being associated with marijuana, and many medical professionals have recommended it to help cope with various health conditions.

When you’re looking to buy hemp oil in Topeka, it can be incredibly tough trying to distinguish one brand or company from the next. If you know your stuff, you’ll know that the best brands in Topeka source their raw material from legal industrial hemp, extract the active CBD with low-temperature CO2 equipment, offer third-party laboratory testing, and produce organic, solvent-free oils, capsules, and tinctures.

Topeka CBD Oil Guide

Why is CBD so popular in Topeka, Kansas?

It’s hard to say the precise moment when CBD in Topeka went from being a fidget spinner alternative for stoners to a mainstream panacea. So the question now becomes: Is this the dawning of a new miracle elixir, or does all the hype mean we have already reached Peak CBD?

Is CBD Legal in Topeka, KS?

The cannabis plant comes in many different varieties. For decades though, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) treated them all the same, classifying cannabis as a Schedule I substance. Schedule I drugs are considered to have “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse” and are thus illegal to produce or possess.

However, the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (aka the Farm Bill) changed all that. The Farm Bill legalized “hemp,” which the legislation defined as cannabis that contains no more than 0.3% THC, in Topeka, Kansas and surrounding areas like Wichita and Soldier.

CBD is available in a variety of forms. Some of the most common CBD delivery methods are listed below, but how it’s ultimately used depends on personal needs and preferences. The delivery method of CBD affects how quickly it works and what kinds of effects it has on the body.

  • Edibles are broad range of products to eat or drink, like gummies or chocolates. Edibles can take anywhere from 20 minutes to four hours to take effect.
  • Oils and tincturesare processed and concentrated forms of CBD that are often placed under the tongue using a dropper and absorbed into the bloodstream.
  • Pills and capsules are ingested orally and look similar to the vitamins and/or drugs you’d find in a drugstore. They typically contain CBD oil or CBD isolate.
  • Topicals are CBD-infused oils, creams and lotions that are intended to be used directly on skin, hair or nails. They’re a popular way to treat localized pain, but are also used as skincare, haircare and massage oil as well.
  • Vaping, like e-cigarettes, involves inhaling a vaporized liquid that contains CBD oil. Nicotine is not usually present if CBD is, though it is possible to mix them.

As you can see, there are plenty of CBD available in Topeka, KS, as well as CBD stores that sell products online.

According to Forbes, CBD sales in Kansas are projected to increase by 700% this year. Consumers are catching on to this super compound found in the marijuana and hemp plant. It?s healing properties are plentiful and research continues to discover even more. As more people look to put good into their bodies as a means of truly healing and extending their life expectancy, the popularity of CBD will continue to increase. If you?re suffering from any of the ailments listed above, talk with your doctor about potentially using alternative measures like CBD to treat it. It may just be the natural alternative you were looking for.

Buy CBD Oil in Topeka from N8 Essentials! We have the best in class collection of CBD and Hemp oil available in Topeka, Kansas. Click to learn more.

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thc to cbd ratio

Understanding the confusing world of CBD and THC ratios

The world of CBD-rich marijuana products is getting bigger.

This post is part of our High-tech High series, which explores weed innovations, and our cultural relationship with cannabis, as legalization in several U.S. states, Canada, and Uruguay moves the market further out of the shadows.

There’s a flurry of new numbers on marijuana product labels, and the ratios can feel like a confusing math problem.

But there’s a method to the madness — one based more on anecdotes than broadly recognized scientific research.

A variety of vape oils, tinctures, salves, and edibles with numbers like 18:1, 4:1, and 1:1 — noting the amount of CBD to THC — have been showing up at dispensaries in recent years in both medical and recreational states. THC will make you high, while its sister compound CBD generally won’t — and has therapeutic potential. Most marijuana strains have around 18 percent THC with less than 1 percent CBD (with THC sometimes being pushed beyond 20 percent).

The cannabis companies behind the trend aren’t chucking THC; they’re just flipping the ratios. For decades, growers have focused on breeding weed with increased amounts of THC. That’s still the case to a large degree, but a sliver of the market sees big things for CBD-rich marijuana products.

“They kept getting bred to go higher and higher in THC, so most strains have very low CBD,” said Dennis Hunter, cofounder of Cannacraft, a Santa Rosa cannabis producer with a line of CBD-rich products under the brand name Care by Design. “Now they’re starting to breed those to be higher and higher in CBD.”

Care by Design, and other companies like Pure Ratios in San Diego, use previous customers’ experiences to guide new users toward their preferred ratio.

But with scant evidence-backed scientific research regarding the impact of each ratio, consumers resort to trial and error to see what works for them.

A 1:1 CBD to THC vape pen.

Image: Care by Design

An 18:1 CBD to THC vape pen.

Image: Care by Design

CBD-rich products are marketed toward those seeking relief from anxiety, arthritis, seizures, stress, inflammation, and overall wellness, not necessarily a high. They’re also being used to ease those once spooked off by a bad marijuana experience back in. Baby boomers are Care by Design’s biggest growing customer base.

There are plenty of anecdotes from customers reporting life-changing relief with unregulated CBD-rich products, but it’s still a gamble and you’re the guinea pig. And these products aren’t cheap. Care by Design’s cartridges are $50 and its droppers are $40. Pure Ratios’ droppers are around $30. CBD oil made from hemp, which has less than 0.3 percent THC, from Bloom Farms, for example, ranges from $60 to $90.

Cinnamon Bidwell, a neurobiologist at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Institute of Cognitive Science, cautions not to get swept up in the testimonials promoted by cannabis manufacturers.

“The marketing and the consumer lure is far ahead of what the research can really support,” said Bidwell. That seems to be the case for marijuana in general since its classification as a so-called Schedule 1 drug — which means the federal government believes it has “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse” — makes it difficult to study. Bidwell’s lab, which is in a state that has legalized recreational marijuana, is conducting a 5-year study comparing the cannabinoids subjects ingest to what shows up in their bloodstreams in relation to clinical outcomes.

What’s more, all the ratios can be hard to understand. Care by Design offers five (18:1, 8:1, 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1), while Pure Ratios cut down to three (18:1, 4:1, and 1:1) because customers were confused by the variety, said CEO Chad Conner.

Image: Bob Al-Greene / Mashable

Here’s a rule of thumb: The higher the CBD, the less of a high you’ll get from the THC, both because there’s less of it and CBD generally combats THC’s psychoactive effects, depending on the amount of THC you’ve consumed, according to cannabis researchers and producers.

When you’re deciding which ratio is right for you, it’ll take some experimenting. Both Hunter and Conner suggest starting with a high-level of CBD and working your way down to a more balanced product. You’ll have to play around with the amount, too, but take it slow.

Care by Design sells a sampler pack to help in the guessing game. The ends of the spectrum, 18:1 or 1:1, are its best sellers; either consumers don’t want to feel psychoactive effects or they do, it seems.

The trial and error, Bidwell said, is what happens when cannabis products rush into the market before there’s sufficient research.

There is, however, a prescription 1:1 CBD to THC mouth spray called Sativex made in the UK and available in several countries including Spain, Germany, Canada, and Brazil that’s meant to treat spasms in MS patients. It’s undergoing clinical trials in the U.S. Epidiolex, the first FDA-approved cannabis-derived drug in the states, is high in CBD with trace amounts of THC (not enough to have any pharmacological effect). It’s used to treat seizures.

“We’re starting to understand what CBD does, but even that is very minimal. And in terms of these different ratios, there’s an idea or a hypothesis that there’s something there in terms of THC facilitating CBD’s action in a different way, if not more in different amounts. But in terms of the science being able to contribute to that in any kind of clear way, we’re not there yet,” Bidwell said.

Elliot Altman, biology director of the Tennessee Center for Botanical Medicine Research, disagrees with that assessment when it comes to CBD’s therapeutic benefits. His lab at Middle Tennessee State University studies CBD and hemp. Marijuana isn’t legal in Tennessee, but hemp is. Most CBD products are made from hemp extract, while the ratio products tend to include a variety of cannabis strains to get the right proportion.

It’s clear to Altman, who does not study THC, that CBD provides relief for those with inflammatory or autoimmune conditions, but if you’re looking for pain relief, that’s going to come from THC. Altman’s lab works with private groups looking to sell CBD from hemp as a nutritional supplement.

“THC is for pain, and CBD is for when your immune system is compromised,” Altman said. His take on these emerging products is pretty simple: “If what you’re really after is CBD, but you’re in a marijuana state, take a little THC to take the edge off, don’t take excessive THC.”

What do CBD to THC ratios mean and what can they really do?

Understanding CBD:THC Ratios

Selecting quality cannabis products takes some time and careful consideration. Knowing what is in the products you choose is important. Knowing how much of each of those ingredients or components is in a product – not just the amount but also the ratio of one key ingredient to another – is also key to anticipating the potential effects that product may produce.

When we’re talking about cannabis products, the term “ratio” typically refers to the ratio of CBD to THC. These types of ratios can be expressed as CBD:THC (the amount of CBD versus THC).

As we discussed in “The Entourage or Ensemble Effect”, the relationship between THC and CBD is interesting because it is both complementary and antagonistic meaning they both work together in some ways, but in other ways, they work to modify the effects of the other.

Here are some examples of ratios and what those ratios could mean:

40:1 – 40 parts CBD to 1 part THC. This ratio contains a significantly higher amount of CBD that will impact the way the low amount of THC works overall. The focus of a product with this combination is on the benefits of CBD.

18:1 – 18 parts CBD to 1 part THC. With a higher CBD content compared to the THC content, this ratio is not overly psychoactive and can be a good starting point for someone new to CBD or THC.

8:1 – 8 parts CBD to 1 part THC which is more of a mid-range amount of CBD. Again, the CBD content dominates the THC content for a tempering effect that minimizes overt psychoactivity.

4:1 – 4 parts CBD to 1 part THC. This ratio still has a CBD content higher than the THC, which is in the mid-range, but the THC will produce some more pronounced psychoactive effects.

2:1 – 2 parts CBD to 1 part THC. There could be more overt psychoactivity depending on a person’s THC tolerance level since this ratio is a little more equal, with less CBD to temper the THC.

1:1 – 1 part CBD to 1 part THC. While this ratio looks the most balanced, it will actually produce more of an overall psychoactivity and may be better suited for a person with a higher tolerance to THC.

Picking the right ratio is an individual thing – no two people’s bodies or brains (or endocannabinoid systems) are alike. If a person is a novice, a reasonable place to start is at the ratio with the highest amount of CBD versus the THC content. Over time, easing into trying ratios with higher THC will, inevitably, produce different effects but how strong is to be determined person to person.

Selecting quality cannabis products takes some time and careful consideration. Knowing what is in the products you choose is important.

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coconut oil cannabis ratio

How To: Infuse Coconut Oil With Weed!

Infusing your own coconut oil with cannabis and using it to make DIY edibles is probably a lot easier than you may have thought!
There’s a wealth of information out there, and many an argument has been had over the best way to do it. The method we’re sharing is one of our favorites; we think the difficulty-to-quality ratio is just right! All you need is ten minutes to prepare the ingredients, and about two hours of time to hang out at home while your oven does all of the magic for you.
**This recipe is for a small quantity – but you can easily double, triple, or even quadruple it if you so desire!

Ingredients you’ll need:

  • 7g (aka ¼ oz) of cannabis flower (You can also use trim! If you go this route, we suggest using a full ounce)
  • 100g (aka ½ cup) of coconut oil

Supplies you’ll need:

  • A scale (or, just a quarter-ounce bag of weed!)
  • Scissors or an herb/cannabis grinder
  • An oven-safe baking dish (We recommend using a glass dish; a 9×9 size will work perfectly for the amount in this recipe. You can step up to a 9×13 size if you’re doubling or tripling the recipe!)
  • Aluminum foil
  • A medium stovetop pan
  • A spoon (Wooden spoons are preferred – but you can use whatever you have on hand!)
  • Cheesecloth
  • A storage container for the final product (Standard 16oz mason jars work great for this, but it’s not necessary – as long as your container is at least 6oz and resealable, you’ll be just fine!)

What to do:

  1. Using your scale, weigh out 7 grams of weed. If you purchased a quarter-ounce of cannabis to use for this, then reweighing isn’t necessary. Skip to the next step!
  2. Preheat your oven to 215°F
  3. Break up the weed using a cannabis grinder or a pair of scissors
  4. Cover the bottom of your baking dish with the ground cannabis, and seal tightly with aluminum foil
  5. Bake it in the 215°F oven for 30 minutes to activate the cannabis. This process is called decarboxylation, and it helps to create a more potent oil infusion!
  6. Remove from the oven, leaving the aluminum foil tight over the top. Keeping it sealed helps prevent cannabinoid-rich vapor or steam from escaping the container, and allows it to settle back into the herb – again, helping with potency!
  7. Melt your coconut oil in a medium-size pan over low heat while the baking dish filled with herb cools
  8. After the herb dish has been left to cool for about 15 minutes, uncover and pour the melted coconut oil over the cannabis. Use a spoon to mix until combined; the goal is to coat all of the dry herb with oil!
  9. Cover tightly with the aluminum foil once more, and return it to the 215°F oven for an hour and a half. If possible, it’s best to stir/agitate the mixture once or twice while it’s baking. Doing so helps the cannabinoids distribute more evenly.
  10. Remove the dish from the oven, and let cool with the aluminum foil cover on for 15-20 minutes – until you can comfortably handle the dish.
  11. Place a double-layer of cheesecloth over the opening of whatever storage vessel you’re using for your infused oil
  12. Carefully pour your infusion over the cheesecloth, straining out all chunks of plant matter in the process
  13. Gather up the sides of the cheesecloth into a bundle, and squeeze out as much remaining oil as possible
  14. You’re all done!

You’ve just created a batch of activated cannabis-infused coconut oil, and now you’re all set to make your own edibles! Celebrate by making a delectably potent batch of cookies, spice up your favorite stir-fry with a drizzle before serving, or create a delicious homemade vinaigrette – you can use this anywhere you would use “regular” coconut oil, making it perfect for any sweet or savory recipe. You could also let that mixture cool down, and then enjoy your brand-new homemade topical. The possibilities with this infusion are endless!

A friendly reminder:
Always be cautious when consuming cannabis-infused edibles! Onset time can vary vastly from one person to the next, taking anywhere from 30 minutes to 2.5 hours for folks to feel effects. It is always better to start conservatively, testing to see how strong your batch turned out, than to accidentally overdo it and get a bit too high. If we were to estimate, we’d say this about a ½ teaspoon portion of this oil would equate to approximately a 10mg serving size. The Washington State LCB considers 10mg to be a “standard dose” of cannabis when consumed in edible form.

Infusing your own coconut oil with cannabis and using it to make DIY edibles is probably a lot easier than you may have thought!

How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Introduction: How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It’s great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, too – you can use indica, sativa, or even high CBD strains to get the desired effect you want.

It’s also super easy to make, and a great way to use up excess trim, kief or hash from harvest. In this instructable I’ll show you my favorite way to do it – simmering on the stove top! But I’ll tell you how to do it in a crockpot too.

This is a very fast and no-fuss version of canna oil – through lots of reading and quite a few experiments I really don’t believe it’s necessary to simmer it for-ev-errr and over complicate it. This method will give you a potent, tasty and fancy canna oil.

Step 1: What You’ll Need

tools:

  • cheesecloth
  • metal strainer/sieve
  • bowl or large measuring cup
  • jar or bowl to store the canna oil

materials:

  • decarboxylated cannabis (buds, trim, kief, hash – 40 grams)
  • unrefined coconut oil (2 cups)

We’ll talk a little about dosing on the next step.

Unsure how to decarboxylate cannabis? Click here to find out!

Step 2: Dosing + Strains + Expectations

(Pictured above – Doctor Who water hash, Doctor Who in bud form – so purple. Doctor Who sugar leaf trim)

What I’m using for this batch:

  • 2 cups unrefined coconut oil
  • 40 g Doctor Who trim, decarboxylated

This is a fairly strong dose – about 1.5 g of trim per tablespoon of canna oil. The medibles this canna oil makes will be used primarily for combating migraines so stronger is better!

Guidelines for dosing:

I recommend using anywhere from 0.5-1.5 g of trim/bud/hash/etc per tablespoon of oil. If this is your first time experimenting with canna oil, try using 16 grams of cannabis to 2 cups of oil.

When using buds, it’s okay to use less than you would if you were using trim as there will be more trichromes present and therefore more THC. If I was using buds instead of trim in this batch, I probably would have used 0.5 grams of bud per tablespoon of coconut oil.

For more information on dosing cannabis, I really recommend picking up a copy of The Ganja Kitchen Revolution by Jessica Catalano. The book includes a very nice dosing chart and explains how to demystify making edibles with the right amount of THC for you.

This article on The Cannabist also includes a helpful way of figuring out the THC content in edibles.

What to expect when using canna oil:

Cannabis taken orally a totally different beast – it can take you much longer to feel it, and the effects can linger much longer on average. Canna oil is often quite potent and can make you super sleepy, so never try a new dose when you have obligations later. 😉

You can try to combat sleepiness by using only sativas in your canna oil, or by choosing a strain high in CBD. But it might still make you a teeny bit tired (edibles always do that to some folks!), so always use caution.

What to do if you take too much canna oil:

If you ever take too much while trying to figure out the proper dose, don’t worry! You may feel anxious or wonder why you ever thought this was a good idea – but I promise it will pass and the benefits are worth it.

Your best bet is to drink a glass of water and lie down. Sleeping is always the best possible way to handle having a bit too much cannabis.

If sleep seems unreachable, try dimming the lights and putting on music or the TV. You can try talking to someone too. Whatever relaxes you! Just keep in mind that it will pass in a few hours at most.

Step 3: Combine the Coconut Oil and Cannabis and Simmer

Combine the cannabis and coconut oil in a small saucepan over the lowest heat you can manage.

Once the coconut oil has melted, let the mix simmer uncovered (stirring ever so often) for an hour.

HEY! If you’d like to do this in a crockpot you definitely can. Just let it go on low for a couple hours. It’s not necessary to take it longer than that.

If your canna oil turns out super green or not green at all, that’s fine. The green-ness relates only to the chlorophyll present, not how strong the canna oil is.

Step 4: Strain

For straining, use cheesecloth in a sieve over a large measuring cup. A sieve normally isn’t fine enough on its own! It won’t matter too much if you end up with particulates in the oil, but it always looks nicer without them.

Place two layers of cheesecloth in the sieve and put it over the measuring cup.

Pour the hot oil and cannabis mixture into the cheesecloth.

Let it drip for an hour or so and then squeeze the rest out by hand.

You can use the processed cannabis in other things once you’ve squeezed out the oil, but it shouldn’t have much THC left in it at all. One of the most awesome ways is to mix it with softened butter – you end up with an awesome cannabis compound butter that you can use on toast or maybe even put a dollop on a steak or under the skin of a chicken.

However, don’t feel bad if you just compost it or throw it out – nearly all the good stuff is in the canna oil now!

Step 5: Cool and Store

Pour the canna oil into a glass jar or bowl and leave uncovered until room temperature and beginning to solidify. (Leaving it uncovered is very important because we want to avoid condensation forming in the jar)

Once entirely cooled, close the container and store in the fridge or in a cool dark place. This will keep for up to a year!

See how dark it is before and how light it is when it solidifies? That’s what it should look like if you don’t simmer it too long and you’re not too rough with it. If you poked it a ton it might be more green.

Step 6: Using Cannabis Coconut Oil

You can consume this coconut canna oil on its own or use it in edibles!

If this is your first time trying it, I recommend taking 1/4-1/2 tablespoon by mouth to start. Wait at least 3-4 hours before taking more. How you feel after this will let you know if you need to increase or decrease your dose. It will also give you a baseline for edibles.

If making edibles, try using recipes you’ve made before. Knowing how many cookies, muffins, slices of cake, etc. that a recipe produces will allow you to figure out about how much THC per serving there is. (Because we know we’re using a certain amount of cannabis per tablespoon of coconut oil – you can determine the strength based on the amount of oil you used in the recipe and how many servings it makes)

Another good thing to keep in mind: you can even do half canna oil and half butter if you need the edibles to be a little less strong.

How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil): Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It's great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, t…

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cbd cramps

I Really Need CBD Brands to Stop Lying to Me About Period Cramps

Getty Images/ razerbird

I was scrolling through my emails recently, exorcising spam, when one subject line caught my eye: “CBD for PMS? 🙌🏼Hallelujah! 🙌🏼.” The hemp company’s newsletter could not have been more on point—I was smack dab in the middle of one of my most painful periods to date. I opened the email, and my heating pad slipped as I shifted to the edge of my seat.

Could this really be the magical answer to the burning ball of fiery knives inside my uterus? I thought.

The newsletter was riddled with seemingly relatable Friends GIFs, clever alliterations, and marketing buzzwords to get the reader to buy, buy, buy! “PMS Pain Be Gone!” it read. But what it didn’t have was products that have been proven to—in any way, shape, or form—actually minimize excruciating period cramps.

I was floored. Not just as someone with intense period pain due to endometriosis, but also as a C-suite-level marketing professional. I couldn’t tell what was worse, the cramps in my uterus or the knife in my back.

One of the products was a patch with only 15 mg of CBD, also called cannabidiol, a compound found in cannabis that does not produce a high. Using that to try to manage my pain would be like putting a Band-Aid on a gushing head wound. How do I know this? For starters, I typically consume between 30 mg and 50 mg of CBD in a single dose when I’m taking it to manage my pain. And as much as I feel CBD assists me in my pain management, it’s not my cure-all. I could replace my blood with CBD oil and I would still have intense cramps. If something has only 15 mg of CBD, I don’t have to try it to know it’s not going to cure my PMS. Not to mention, there’s just no science or regulation behind these claims.

I quickly grabbed my phone and did what all opinionated millennial women do: rant on social media. Messages immediately poured in. I was not alone. Other women had similar experiences with the new wave of CBD products. Screenshots of high-end packaging and their ingredient labels flooded my DMs. Once again, I was taken aback by the prices, claims, ingredients, and minimal CBD contents.

If a product hasn’t been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the brand behind that product cannot legally claim it will cure any ailment. From the FDA itself: ”Unlike drug products approved by the FDA, unapproved CBD drug products have not been subject to FDA review as part of the drug approval process, and there has been no FDA evaluation regarding whether they are safe and effective to treat a particular disease, what the proper dosage is, how they could interact with other drugs or foods, or whether they have dangerous side effects or other safety concerns.”

This is an incredibly personal issue for me because my periods are definitely not normal. I received my official endometriosis diagnosis after a laparoscopy in the summer of 2015. I have been working ever since to manage the painful, frustrating symptoms, which I’ve dealt with unofficially for over a decade. Traditional painkillers barely scratch the surface of my pain, and I had trouble getting doctors to take my level of pain seriously.

Up until my surgery, I was subjected to bouts of extreme discomfort and frequent UTIs. Sex was painful, and sometimes I would bleed during or after. I developed depression and anxiety while going through these unsuccessful battles with an ever-growing list of symptoms that went undiagnosed for years. I was opposed to opioid use and searched for an alternative. Not only do I understand the allure of using cannabis for period paid—I do it myself, and I find that some products really do help.

CBD and hemp brands are marketing their products for managing pain and period cramps, but as someone with endometriosis, I know they won’t help me.

Cannabinoids & Your Period

  • Should I take CBD oil for period cramps?
  • How do CBD and ibuprofen compare?
  • How can I get the best benefits from CBD oil for my period?

It’s that time of the month again — time to call in sick, cancel plans, curl up in bed with a hot water bottle, and try to distract yourself with a non-stop stream of movies and TV.

If this sounds like your monthly ritual, you are not alone. Up to 90% of reproductive-age women suffer from painful periods — the medical term for it is “dysmenorrhea” — and it can completely derail your daily life.

Cannabinoids & Suppositories Help

More and more women are reporting that CBD and THC products are the best tools they have for treating painful periods. But how do they stack up when compared to NSAIDs like Ibuprofen?

Quite well, it turns out, but it’s worth a deeper look at why they work — exactly how cannabinoids’ anti-inflammatory, pain-relieving, muscle-relaxing effects interact with your period.

This touches on the actual causes of pain & discomfort during your period, and how additional natural remedies can help combat these symptoms.

Move over NSAIDs and heating pads! Read on to discover why cannabinoids might become your new favorite companion when your period comes to town.

Your Uterus: Prepping for a Visit

In people who have periods, the uterus diligently prepares itself all month.

First, your body’s increasing estrogen told your uterus to build up its endometrial tissue. Then, after you ovulated, and the boost of progesterone helped plump up that tissue with arteries and blood — prepping to give a warm welcome to an incoming embryo … or in this case to prepare for menstruation.

Goodbye, Progesterone

Once your body discovers it won’t be hosting a guest, your progesterone levels decline — telling your uterus to roll up the welcome mat.

Your body takes back what it can from the endometrium, shrinking the tissue and cutting off blood flow to its spiral-shaped arteries. Without a proper blood supply, your endometrial tissue prepares to shed, and you likely begin experiencing pangs of pain.

Without progesterone, the endometrium loses its protection – creating a domino effect, and the perfect conditions for inflammation.

Prostaglandins: Inflaming the Uterus

While your progesterone was declining, inflammatory chemicals called prostaglandins were increasing. Prostaglandins (particularly one called PGF2⍺) peak during menstruation, creating the following effects:

  • Inflammation : certain prostaglandins trigger an inflammatory response, which leads to more pain.
  • Pain sensitization : prostaglandins and other inflammatory compounds can actually prime pain-perceiving nerves to become more sensitive.
  • Vasoconstriction : the prostaglandins rampant during menstruation cause blood vessels to constrict, inhibiting blood flow to the endometrial tissue.
  • Uterine contractions : People with higher prostaglandin levels have stronger, more painful contractions and doctors are finally acknowledging that this pain can be as intense as heart attack pain.
  • Heavy bleeding : Unusually heavy periods could result from excessive inflammation, which increases tissue damage. People with heavy bleeding have higher levels of the enzyme the produces prostaglandins (COX-2), and medications to combat this process can decrease menstruation .
  • Diarrhea : In addition to uterus contractions, prostaglandins also trigger smooth muscle contractions in the digestive tract — which might push your last few meals out a bit too soon.

(Note: some people claim that having sex helps to jump-start their periods — scientists believe that the prostaglandins in semen could contribute to this effect.)

We’re not trying to say that prostaglandins are all bad. They’re essential for a healthy, functioning menstrual cycle.

However, numerous studies indicate that women with higher levels of prostaglandins also have more painful or heavier periods — and treatments that lower prostaglandin levels can be highly effective .

NSAIDs Work, Sort Of

When their periods kick in, most women reach for an Ibuprofen or similar NSAID (Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug). Why are NSAIDs the most frequently-prescribed treatment for menstrual pain?

NSAIDs work by inhibiting the enzyme responsible for producing prostaglandins (COX-2). This means that NSAIDs could potentially decrease all the symptoms aggravated by prostaglandins — including inflammation, contractions and pain.

Unfortunately, NSAIDs can also have unpleasant gastrointestinal side effects, because they inhibit another enzyme (COX-1). For this reason, NSAIDs should be used with moderation, and people with certain digestive issues might want to avoid them entirely.

CBD: a Better Alternative?

Recently, scientists discovered that — similar to NSAIDs — CBD also inhibits the prostaglandin-producing enzyme . However — unlike NSAIDs — CBD preferentially inhibits COX-2 over COX-1, which means its anti-inflammatory benefits come without the gastrointestinal side effects.

Added bonus: Not only does CBD inhibit the COX-2 enzyme, but both CBD and THC physically stop your DNA from producing so much of this enzyme in the first place (via the PPARγ receptor).

Additional Cannabinoid Benefits

By decreasing prostaglandin levels during your period, you can reduce inflammation, pain and cramps. However, you cannot entirely eliminate prostaglandins.

This means that you could benefit from combining a prostaglandin-reducing treatment with other treatments that target the discomforts caused by prostaglandins.

CBD and other cannabinoids can also treat painful menstrual cramps in the following ways:

  • Anti-inflammatory: Cannabinoids have many anti-inflammatory activities beyond reducing production of inflammatory prostaglandins. For instance, THC activates endocannabinoid receptors ( CB2 ) located on your immune system’s killer cells ( macrophages ). When these receptors are activated, they prevent macrophages from releasing inflammatory proteins ( cytokines ).
  • Pain-relieving: Although prostaglandins and other inflammatory molecules can make pain-perceiving nerves more sensitive, cannabinoids fight back by desensitizing these nerves. Both CBD and THC target nerve receptors that help decrease the sensation of pain ( TRPV1 and CB1 , respectively). Additionally, not only does CBD desensitize TRPV1, but those soothing effects can spread to neighboring pain receptors.
  • Muscle-relaxing : Menstrual cramps are exacerbated by contractions of the smooth muscle lining the uterus — and cannabinoids are widely recognized to relax smooth muscles. THC and CBD both target different receptors embedded in the muscle tissue to relax contractions .
  • Vascular-relaxing : Blood vessels are also lined with smooth muscle, and when cannabinoids trigger this smooth muscle to relax, blood flow increases. Increased blood flow could help provide relief to oxygen-starved tissues, further decreasing painful cramps.

Natural Remedies for Cramps

  • Apply heat : Hot water bottles may seem old-fashioned, but they can bring as much relief from menstrual cramps as NSAIDs — and oftentimes much faster. Heat increases blood flow to the area, which soothes the overworked muscles and delivers oxygen to oxygen-starved tissues. Some scientists also think that heat desensitizes the same pain receptors that CBD works on.
  • Fish oil : Interestingly enough, multiple studies have demonstrated that daily fish oil supplements decrease pain and reliance on NSAIDs during periods. It turns out that prostaglandins are synthesized from omega fatty acids, and a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids could shift your body away from producing inflammatory prostaglandins.
  • Magnesium : Do you ever crave chocolate around this time of the month? Women who take magnesium supplements during their periods have reduced pain and reduced inflammatory prostaglandin levels . Foods like chocolate, lentils and avocados are high in magnesium — so go ahead and feed the craving.
  • Treat early : Many doctors suggest that it’s best to start taking painkillers an hour or more before the cramps start. This is true whether you’re using NSAIDs, CBD, or other cannabinoid blends. If you hold off treatment until you’re in excruciating pain, the prostaglandins will already be in full demolition mode and harder to bring under control.
  • Discuss your treatment plan with a doctor : Sometimes painful cramps and/or heavy bleeding can be a symptom of an underlying problem like endometriosis ( another painful condition that can be soothed by cannabinoids ). We encourage you to talk with your doctor about your symptoms and treatment plan in order to rule out other health problems, particularly if your symptoms don’t improve with standard treatments. Your doctor can help you determine if there are surgical or hormonal treatments that could be more effective.

Finding Relief With Cannabinoid Suppositories

Many women are shocked and surprised to experience how effective cannabinoids are at relieving menstrual cramps (especially cannabinoid suppositories ).

But the science is pretty clear about why: CBD targets the cause — inflammatory prostaglandins — while also relieving the symptoms (especially with help from a little THC).

Perhaps this is why women and people who bleed have been using cannabis to treat period pain for millennia . Though there are increasing numbers of doctors and scientists who know why cannabinoids work to relieve menstrual cramps, many more of them are only just beginning to hear from their female patients about how well cannabinoids work for their periods.

If you’re considering treating your menstrual cramps with cannabinoids for the first time, we encourage you to read testimonials from other customers . You may also be curious to know how cannabinoids help to soothe endometriosis .

And if “weed tampons” aren’t available in your city or state , try our Relief Suppositories with CBD which are now available online and ship worldwide .

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Women are reporting that CBD and THC products are the best tools for treating painful periods. But how do they stack up when compared to NSAIDs like Ibuprofen? Quite well, it turns out, but let's discover exactly how cannabinoids’ anti-inflammatory, pain-relieving, muscle-relaxing effects interact with your period.

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Electronic versions of our publications are provided as a courtesy to facilitate timely dissemination of academic work for individual, noncommercial purposes. All rights reside with the respective copyright holders.

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pros and cons of cbd oil

Hemp Oil: Is It Good for You?

In this Article

In this Article
In this Article
  • Nutrition Information
  • Potential Health Benefits of Hemp Oil
  • Potential Risks of Hemp Oil

Hemp oil, also known as hemp seed oil, is made from hemp, a cannabis plant like the drug marijuana but containing little to no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical that gets people “high.” Instead of THC, hemp contains cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical that has been used to treat everything from epilepsy to anxiety.

Hemp is increasingly popular as a remedy for a range of conditions including skin issues and stress. It may contain properties that contribute to reduced risks of illnesses like Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease, though additional research is necessary. Hemp oil may also reduce inflammation in the body.

In addition to CBD, Hemp oil contains large amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fats, which are two types of unsaturated fat s, or “good fats,” and all nine essential amino acids, the materials your body uses to make protein. Here’s more information about nutrients in hemp seed oil and how they may benefit your health.

Nutrition Information

Hemp oil is made from hemp seeds. In one serving of hemp seeds (3 tablespoons), you’ll find the following:

  • Calories: 170
  • Calories from fat: 108
  • Total fat: 12 grams
  • Saturated fat: 1 grams
  • Trans fat: 0 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 0 grams
  • Total carbohydrates: 5 grams
  • Sugars: 1 grams
  • Protein: 10 grams

Hemp seeds also contain these minerals and hemp nutrients:

  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Omega-3 fatty acids
  • Gamma linolenic acid
  • Arginine
  • Magnesium
  • B vitamins

Many of these nutrients provide the body necessary minerals and also contribute to overall health. Note that hemp seeds contain a significant amount of iron (20 % of your recommended daily diet). This helps prevent iron deficiency, or anemia.

Potential Health Benefits of Hemp Oil

Hemp seed oil is used as a remedy for a range of conditions. Some studies show that its nutrients and minerals can contribute to better skin and heart health as well as reduced inflammation. Here’s a deeper look at what the research says about the potential health benefits of hemp oil:

Improved Cardiovascular Health

The amino acid arginine is present in hempseed oil. Studies have shown that this ingredient contributes to a healthy cardiovascular system. Consuming foods with high arginine levels can help decrease the risk of heart disease.

Continued

In studies, the CBD in hemp oil has been shown to reduce seizures in rare types of childhood epilepsy that are resistant to other treatments, Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Regularly taking CBD can also reduce the number of seizures brought on by tuberous sclerosis complex, a condition that causes tumors to form throughout the body.

Reduced Inflammation

Over time, excess inflammation in your body can contribute to a variety of diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and asthma. It has been suggested that gamma linolenic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid found in hemp, acts as an anti-inflammatory. Studies have also linked the omega-3 fatty acids in hemp with reductions in inflammation.

Healthier Skin

Spreading hemp oil on your skin as a topical application can also reduce symptoms and provide relief for several types of skin disorders. One study showed that hemp oil can act as an effective acne treatment, though more research is needed in this area. In addition, consuming hemp seed oil was found to improve symptoms of atopic dermatitis, or eczema, due to the presence of the “good” polyunsaturated fats in the oil.

Potential Risks of Hemp Oil

Although hemp and marijuana come from the same species of cannabis plant, hemp has little to no THC. This means that consuming hemp is legal in the U.S. and will not cause you to become intoxicated or impaired.

In general, hemp seed oil is safe to ingest or use topically, but there are a few things to note if you decide to start taking hemp oil. Pay attention to the following potential risks of hemp oil:

Some people experience skin irritation when using topical oils containing CBD, possibly due to an allergy. Start with using a small amount to see how your skin reacts to it, and keep an eye on any changes.

Digestive Issues

It’s possible that ingesting CBD-containing oils like hemp oil can cause an upset stomach or diarrhea. Again, when you’re first introducing hemp oil into your diet, start small to see how it impacts you. Reactions may be different from person to person.

Sources

Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: “Omega-3 Supplementation Lowers Inflammation and Anxiety in Medical Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.”

Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment: “Scoping paper on the potential adverse effects of CBD products.”

Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports: “Cannabis for the Treatment of Epilepsy: an Update.”

Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: “Gamma linolenic acid: an antiinflammatory omega-6 fatty acid.”

ESHA Research, Inc., Salem, Oregon: “Hemp Oil.”

GW Research Ltd.: “A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cannabidiol (GWP42003-P, CBD) for Seizures in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (GWPCARE6).”

Harvard Men’s Health Watch: “Iron and your health.”

Journal of Clinical Investigation: “Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes.”

Journal of Dermatological Treatment: “Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.”

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: “Clinicians’ Guide to Cannabidiol and Hemp Oils.”

Nutrition & Metabolism: “The cardiac and haemostatic effects of dietary hempseed.”

StatPearls: “Chronic Inflammation.”

The Whole U: “Super seeds: Power up with flax, hemp, & chia.”

USDA FoodData Central: “HEMP OIL.”

World Health Organization: “CANNABIDIOL (CBD) Pre-Review Report.”

Find out what the research says about hemp oil, who should avoid it, and how it may affect your health.

CBD Oil for Anxiety & Depression: Pros & Cons

Related Articles

Black Leaders Step Up To Battle Inequity In The Cannabis Industry
Psychedellux: February 5, 2021
Friday Book Club: The Cannabis Health Index

Editors Note: This is a guest post.

There’s always something to worry about, like bills, food, and your health. Whatever the case, anxiety is common, and so is depression. Fortunately, there are a lot of solutions for both.

Some people rely on medications and therapy to overcome anxiety and depression. Others turn to coping mechanisms like yoga and meditation.

Lately, the search for anxiety and depression treatment has been shifting towards more natural medications. In particular, CBD oil.

CBD, or cannabidiol in full, is one type of cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. The oil is a result of the extraction of CBD from the plant, followed by refinement processes. You can get the oil in liquid form, or buy gummies with CBD discounted at the Relaxation Company and make your journey to wellness fun and flavor-filled.

The exact science behind the treatment of anxiety and depression with CBD oil isn’t known yet. Some researchers do believe it works with a receptor in the brain, altering serotonin signals. The serotonin levels are responsible for your mood and well being, and CBD oil blocks the brain from absorbing it, so you get more of it, which improves your mood.

Like any other treatment, the oil has its benefits and disadvantages. Make sure to read more on to find out more pros and cons of CBD oil for anxiety and depression, especially if you are planning on using CBD while traveling !

Pros

Easy to Use

The methods of administration of CBD oil are simple. You can take it by putting a few drops under your tongue using a dropper, or mixing it in your food. Some companies also supply CBD gummies in a variety of milligram strengths and flavors.

Non-psychoactive

Unlike Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another type of cannabinoid, CBD oil is non-psychoactive, so you don’t get high from taking it.

It’s Healthy

Cannabidiol occurs naturally in plants from where it’s extracted and made into an oil. Since it’s a natural treatment, it’s much healthier than traditional medication and better for your body.

Fewer Side Effects

In addition to being healthier than traditional medicine, CBD also has fewer side effects. As long as the effects experienced are mild, it’s a good option for anyone who can’t tolerate the stronger side effects caused by other anxiety medications. It’s also not addictive, which is a common occurrence with traditional alternatives.

Relieves Pain

Cluster headaches and migraines are common in people suffering from depression and anxiety. CBD oil reduces such pains while also treating the underlying causes, so it cures both symptoms and the disease. The oil achieves all this without inducing a psychoactive response, tolerance, or addiction.

Cons

Limited Availability

Since the use of CBD Oil for anxiety, depression, and other medical conditions is still relatively new, the oil isn’t widely available. Federal and state laws in some areas restrict the use of CBD, so you can only buy it in places where medical marijuana is legal.

Unfortunately, that’s not a lot of places. Some suppliers take advantage of this limited supply and put a hefty price tag on the oil, making it even more inaccessible.

Not FDA-Approved

CBD oil is not FDA-Approved for the treatment of anxiety and depression. Since it’s unregulated, that means there’s no set standard of quality that the oil must adhere to, to qualify as a treatment.

As a result, you might come across products with lower or higher quantities of CBD than necessary. Some mislabeled products even have significant amounts of THC, which can aggravate anxiety instead, defeating the purpose of the treatment.

Doesn’t Have Fixed Results

CBD oil is still in the early stages of discovery, so there’s a lot that remains unknown about it. It doesn’t produce the same results in everyone, hence the difficulty in regulating its use or setting a fixed dosage.

Side Effects

Some research into the use of CBD oil indicates that users may experience a few side effects. In some cases, those side effects include anxiety, which makes the oil questionable as a treatment for the mental condition. Other side effects associated with the oil include dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, loss of appetite, mood swings, and low blood pressure.

Conclusion

The effectiveness of CBD oil as a remedy for anxiety and depression remains, unfortunately, overshadowed by the stigma against cannabis. Still, as research continues on the benefits of the oil, more people are starting to realize there’s more good than bad in it.

CBD Oil for Anxiety & Depression: Pros & Cons Related Articles Black Leaders Step Up To Battle Inequity In The Cannabis Industry Psychedellux: February 5, 2021 Friday Book Club: The

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cannabis olive oil recipes

How to make cannabis cooking oil

Infusion is often the most challenging part of cooking with cannabis and the reason why many people turn to their vaporizer in defeat. I’m here to tell you that you can do this! Not only is it doable, but it’s worth it.

If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in.

For this reason, always start with a low dose and see how an edible affects you—especially if you’re cooking your own as it is impossible to calculate their potency.

Self-isolating? Order cannabis online with Leafly Pickup or Delivery

Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or putting in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!

Recipe for cannabis cooking oil

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of ground cannabis flower (or less for milder potency)
  • 1 cup of cooking oil of your choice

Note: When making canna oil, you want to use a 1:1 ratio of cannabis to oil.

Choosing the right cooking oil base for your canna oil

Picking the right oil for infusion comes down to your flavor preferences and the dishes you plan on cooking. Oils will have different consistencies at room temperature, so be sure to put thought into how you will be storing and using your oil.

Many oils work well with baking too! So you might want to choose an oil that will have a flavor and consistency that works for multiple recipes. For example, if you are looking for an oil that can be used in a stir fry as well as a pie crust, coconut oil is a great option. It adds great flavor to veggies and remains solid enough at room temperature to hold up as a pie crust.

If you are looking for an oil with a mild flavor, vegetable and canola oil are going to be great options. They are also very versatile and work with most recipes calling for oil.

If you want something a little more robust in flavor, you can infuse olive or avocado oil. Both stand up well to the cannabis flavor and can be stored in your pantry. One of the most surprisingly delicious deserts I ever had was an olive oil ice cream. So feel free to get creative!

Materials needed:

  • Strainer or cheesecloth
  • Grinder (a simple hand grinder works best; appliances like blenders and coffee grinder pulverize the cannabis, resulting in edibles with bad tasting plant material)
  • Double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, etc.

Directions:

  1. Grind the cannabis. You can include the entire plant, just the flower, a little bit of both—this is all a matter of preference. Just keep in mind that anything small enough to fit through the strainer will end up in your finished product, so again, do not grind your cannabis into a fine powder.
  2. Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, and heat on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning, and the temperature of the oil should never exceed 245°F. Cooking can be done a variety of ways:
    • Crock pot method: Heat oil and cannabis in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally.
    • Double-boiler method: Heat oil and cannabis in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally.
    • Saucepan method: Heat oil and cannabis in a simple saucepan on low for at least 3 hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching).
  3. Strain and store the oil. Do not squeeze the cheesecloth; this will simply add more chlorophyll to your oil. All remaining plant material can be discarded or used in other dishes if desired. The oil’s shelf life is at least two months, and can be extended with refrigeration.

Note: Be cautious when using the oil to prepare dishes that require heating. Do not microwave and choose low heat whenever possible.

Tips for reducing odor when making cannabis oil

The trick for reducing odor is using the right tool for decarboxylation. The steam produced during cooking might not give off a pungent odor at first, but it gets stronger with time. It takes hours for the oil to finish, so you can imagine that the odor can build, and, if you are in the same room the whole time, you may not notice the gradual increase in dankness.

Using kitchen devices with rubber seals on their lids will allow you to lock in the majority of the odor during the cook. Finding a crock pot or pressure cooker with this feature is easy. The seal allows you to be strategic in where and when you open the lid.

Whether you take it outside or put it under your kitchen vent, not allowing the odor to fill your space is paramount when it comes to discretion. But accidents happen! If you find yourself in a situation where your space is too pungent, check out our article on how to get rid of the cannabis odor.

How to cook with your weed oil

Now that you have successfully infused your oil of choice, be sure to try a little before you make an entire meal. You want to make sure the dosage is right so the meal is delicious as well as enjoyable afterward.

You also want to be sure not to scorch the oil while cooking (just like when you are making the oil). It would be a shame for all that hard work to go to waste and to be left with a cannabis-tasting creation without any of the effects.

Now get cooking! I suggest finding a few of your favorite recipes and see if an infused-cannabis oil could work. Experimenting with different recipes is half the fun, and here are a few of our favorite recipes to get you going:

  • Martha Stewart’s “to-die-for” pot brownies: A classic done right!
  • Cannabis-infused mayo: From ranch dressing to aioli, mayo is the base to some of your favorite condiments!
  • Cannabis-infused coconut roasted citrus shrimp: Feeling fancy?
  • Cannabis-infused chocolate hazelnut spread: Find a dessert or savory snack this doesn’t make taste better, I’ll wait.
  • Canna-oil vinaigrette: Balsamic vinaigrettes are great too!

Next up: Learn how to make infused coconut oil!

This post was originally published on September 19, 2013. It was most recently updated on March 20, 2020.

Learn how to make cannabis oil to use when baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing in 3 easy steps.

CBD Olive Oil Recipe, from The Herb Somm

Creating infused olive oil is an essential ingredient for any at-home chef who wants to make elevated cuisine and this CBD, or cannabidiol, olive oil is useful for a variety of recipes. Here’s how to create a CBD olive oil at home using CBD-rich flower. Remember, your dosage numbers will differ depending on the strain and source that you use, so be sure to calculate the CBD milligrams per serving beforehand. Do your best to make an accurate estimate, always use measuring spoons to dose, and always conservatively sample each batch before serving to others.

For this recipe, you are going to use the stove top method for infusion. Once you master this technique, you can easily infuse other essential pantry items such as butter, coconut oil, avocado oil and more. With these ingredients, you can explore other recipes featured in The Ultimate Guide to CBD: Explore the World of Cannabidiol (Fair Winds Press) which debuts in March 2020.

This recipe will yield 28 milligrams of CBD per tablespoon of oil.

A note about cannabis decarboxylation

In order to unlock the full potential of CBD, you must decarboxylate your dry cannabis flower before integrating it into a recipe. Decarboxylation is a heating process that triggers the chemical reaction that releases the carboxylic acids from CBD. In other words, you are converting CBDA to CBD.

While there are many decarboxylation methods, activation is achieved by exposing dry cannabis to heat between 240–295˚F for 20 to 60 minutes. Heat for a shorter time at higher temperatures or for a longer time at lower temperatures between this range. For example, if you’re using a higher temperature (between 275˚F and 295˚F), bake for 20 minutes max and be careful not to overcook. Overheating can degrade cannabinoids and terpenes.

For the purposes of this recipe, we are going to use a decarboxylation technique from cannabis chef Coreen Carroll, co-founder of the Cannaisseur Series.

Heat oven to 275˚F. Line baking sheet with tinfoil. Break up dry flower into pea-sized pieces with fingers or scissors and spread cannabis evenly onto baking sheet. Place baking sheet in oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from heat.

In sterilized 16-ounce Mason jar, combine cannabis flower and olive oil. Seal tightly.

Fill small saucepan with 3-inches water. Place Mason jar in pan and heat on low. Using candy thermometer, bring to gentle boil at 200˚F for 2½ to 3 hours. Make sure water does not exceed 211°F. Add water to saucepan as needed to compensate for evaporation. When finished, remove Mason jar safely with an oven mitt and let cool.

Place cheese cloth in fine-mesh strainer over clean 8-ounce Mason jar. Pour infused olive oil through cheesecloth into jar. Gently press to extract the oil. Avoid squeezing cheesecloth to minimize unattractive chlorophyll flavors.

Store at room temperature in dark cabinet. Makes ¾ cup infused olive oil.

Now used in culinary pursuits across the U.S., Jamie Evans shows us her recipe for CBD-inflused olive oil from her upcoming book, The Ultimate Guide to CBD.

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is cbd legal in china

Cannabis in China – Laws, Use, and History

Cannabis is viewed negatively in China, and it’s illegal to use or sell it. Despite this fact, the country’s hemp industry is booming; with Chinese companies owning over half of the world’s patents for cannabis-related products. Some experts have suggested that this marks a change in attitude for China and a relaxing of the laws in the future.

    • CBD Products
    • Illegal
    • Recreational cannabis
    • Illegal
    • Medicinal cannabis
    • Illegal

Cannabis laws in China

Can you possess and use cannabis in China?

It is illegal to possess or use cannabis in China; and the substance has been largely demonised by the government. This is a relatively new attitude, as prior to the 1980s, most policemen turned a blind eye to cannabis consumption.

Nowadays, the penalties for being caught with cannabis are severe. Offenders run the risk of receiving the death penalty for being in possession of just five kilograms or more. Additionally, strict sentences are imposed; anything from five years imprisonment to a life sentence. In some cases, however, cannabis users may only be detained for 10 to 15 days, and fined a maximum of 1,000 yuan.

The China National Narcotics Control Commission even launched a digital campaign, targeting adolescents. This was part of a national effort to reduce cases of cannabis use among younger people. According to the Chinese government, there were fewer new drug users in 2018 than the previous three years. They reported a decrease of 63% compared with 2015, 56% (2016), and 43% (2017). It’s hard to verify these numbers, as they were not produced by an independent organization.

The Chinese government has also focused its attention on students studying abroad. One such example happened in Canada, where recreational cannabis use was made legal in 2018. Chinese diplomats issued a letter to Chinese citizens living there, urging them to avoid using cannabis.

An excerpt from the letter reads: “In order to protect your own physical and mental health, please avoid contact or using marijuana.”

Can you sell cannabis in China?

The sale or distribution of cannabis is also illegal. If you’re caught selling cannabis (particularly in the stricter areas of China, where the law is more tightly enforced) you can expect a prison sentence and possibly a death sentence, depending on the amount of cannabis in your possession.

Some claim that parts of China are more relaxed than others. One Chinese citizen commented that “Shanghai is not a politically strict city…/… lots of Xinjiang people sell marijuana.” They added: “Some Xinjiangren sell weed outside the clubs and the police just walk by without caring.”

Can you grow cannabis in China?

It is illegal to grow cannabis in your home in China, and you may be prosecuted if you’re caught doing so. Despite this fact, China is the largest hemp producer in the world. It’s believed that it produces over 50% of the globe’s supply.

Is CBD legal in China?

China has a booming cannabidiol (CBD) industry. CBD is a substance extracted from cannabis, but it doesn’t contain high enough levels of THC to product a ‘high’. However, although China produces CBD products, these are exported to other countries. It is not legal to use, purchase or sell CBD in the country.

Can cannabis seeds be sent to China?

Although some stores do sell cannabis seeds in China, the law does not permit their sale. Sending them into the country via the post is also forbidden.

Medicinal cannabis in China

Cannabis’s medical value has been recognised in the country’s culture for millennia. There are numerous references to the plant in Chinese literature, especially regarding the seeds, which have been continuously used in traditional Chinese medicine for at least 1800 years.

Now, in the 21 st century, China is one of the world’s most significant medical cannabis producers. According to the World Intellectual Property Organisation, it owns 309 of the 606 patents relating to cannabis. In economic terms, this puts China in a strong position to cash in on the ‘green rush’ – with more countries choosing to make medicinal cannabis available on prescription.

Although China is a major player in the medical cannabis market, it does not currently have a medical programme in place. Nor does the law permit the use of cannabis for any medical purposes, even with a prescription.

Glenn Davies, group CEO of Singapore-based cannabis company CannAcubed, believes that it’s only a matter of time before medicinal cannabis is legalised in China. “Instead of shipping it all to the US, Canada and Europe so everybody else benefits,” he states, “it makes more sense for them to keep it here.”

However, other industry experts disagree; stating that the negativity surrounding cannabis, not to mention lack of education about its health benefits, are too much of a hurdle to overcome at present.

Industrial hemp in China

China has a huge industrial hemp industry. It’s the world’s largest producer by a significant margin, and exports hemp (and hemp products) across the globe. Demand from North America and Europe is particularly high.

Most of the hemp plantations are currently in the Yunnan and Shandong provinces. Campaigners are attempting to increase cultivation, highlighting the advantages of bringing more employment to the rural work-force. They believe that it could take three million farmers out of poverty and double their annual incomes.

As for the Chinese government? They’re keen to cash in on the economic potential of hemp production, and have stated that further plantations will be established in the Heilongjiang, Gansu, Anhui, Inner Mongolia and Xinjiang provinces.

Good to know

If you are travelling to China (or currently live there), you may be interested to know the following:

  • In spite of the tough laws regarding cannabis possession and sale, it is sold widely across the country. However, black-market cannabis is often poor quality and over-priced.
  • Numbers of people using cannabis and other drugs have increased swiftly in the 21 st century. Experts believe this is due to the country’s growing prosperity; not to mention young people’s exposure to western culture, where drugs-taking is not regarded as such a taboo.

Cannabis history

Cannabis has been grown in China for centuries. In fact, some of the earliest archaeological evidence of hemp usage was found in China, from some rope imprints on a piece of broken pottery. Hemp cloth was also discovered in Chinese burial chambers, dating as far back as 1122 BC.

The ancient Chinese people used it for clothing and rope, and for warfare. As it was strong and durable, it was ideal for making strings for bows, and meant the arrows could fly further. The Chinese also used it for making paper – and were the first people in the world to come up with this invention.

In addition to serving many practical purposes, cannabis was also valued as a medicine. Referred to as ‘ma’, it was used to treat a variety of conditions, from menstrual pain and gout, to constipation and malaria. It was even used as an anaesthetic to reduce pain during surgery.

Cannabis has been continually used in China since the ancient times. Even when the People’s Republic of China was established in 1949, the benefits of cannabis were still being researched. However, increasingly negative perceptions meant that many of the plantations were destroyed throughout the 20 th century, particularly in the 1990s.

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The balance of Ma

The Chinese believe that cannabis (or ‘ma’) is a unique drug, in that it is feminine and masculine. This is sometimes referred to as yin and yang. The yin represented weakness and passivity, the yang, the strong and active. When the two are in balance, this results in a healthy body and mind. However, when they are out of balance, traditional medicine practitioners believe that illness is likely to occur.

Cannabis cultivation in China

Cannabis is grown widely in China (despite the laws) and can often be found growing in the wild. Plants growing in the northern latitudes (where it’s colder) are usually less potent and unpleasant to smoke. Those that grow in the southern areas of the country are considered ‘better quality’. Usually, these crops are grown for personal consumption only.

Dali City is regarded as the epicentre of cannabis cultivation in China. It’s situated in the Yunnan province, which is famous for its wild cannabis. This can be seen growing by houses and even in gardens. As a result of this, cannabis use is quite prevalent in Dali City.

Xinjang is another ‘cannabis hotspot’, and cannabis is reportedly widely available here. Most of the plants grown here are processed into hashish; which is unsurprising, given that 60% of the population here are Uyghur (people that originally come from central and eastern Asia). They’re predominantly Muslim and have brought their traditional hashish-making techniques from the Islamic world.

Attitudes to cannabis

The government’s attitude to cannabis is clear – it is regarded as a damaging substance and should not be consumed under any circumstances.

However, younger people seem to adopt a different attitude. In some of the cities, cannabis-smoking is relatively common, especially among students and young adults. Rural communities still value the plant for its medicinal properties.

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Will it be legalised in the future?

Some experts think it’s only a matter of time before China legalises cannabis for medical use. As the world’s dominant force in the medical cannabis market, it seems odd that they don’t already have a domestic industry already.

The Chinese government’s negative attitude to personal consumption means that it’s unlikely to be legalised for recreational use any time soon. It’s harder to predict what the future holds for medicinal cannabis. The government may make it legal based on cannabis’s integral role in traditional medicine, or may choose maintain their current tough stance.

Comments

23 thoughts on “Cannabis in China – Laws, Use, and History”

Great article!, but as far as i’m concerned, CBD is legal in china, you can buy it online very easily, without thc of course.

Great article. I have met a friend from China who is anti cannabis. So the Drug propaganda has worked on many people. I will try to educate her… With the history of cannabis in China that has been withdrawn and withheld from the public after it was banned. 1985 destroy the history and knowledge and it will be forgotten.

Nice blog and absolutely outstanding. You can do something much better but I still say this perfect. Keep trying for the best. Anyway, Hemp 86 is offering you a new way to smoke. Our cbd flower are a great alternative to traditional cigarettes. Smooth and non-addictive. Made from 100% hemp, they are all-natural.

Excellent writing. You gather some information about this. I think we should continue research about marijuana, cannabis.

We should change our attitude and think about cannabis or marijuana.
Because nowadays the medical purpose of cannabis uses diplomatic signs.
We should properly use this for medical purposes.
We should make awareness among the people and analyze it in detail.

The region that most spawned the Chinese cannabis culture, the mountainous SW, also spawned Tao thinkers and Chinese martial arts. They flooded China with opium in throughout the 19th Century, while the Muslims concurrently moved into that region and shut down cannabis production. But the pendulum of time doth swang.

You can get weed in the Chinese town of Dali, Yunnan. It is not amazing stuff but this is a really incredible town right next to a lake with a historic town. Great place to get buzzed.

Thank you for your comment! Dali is actually one of the places I really want to visit, and Yunnan generally. You might enjoy this article on the divine origins of cannabis seeds according to Chinese mythology 🙂

With best wishes,

You can get weed in the Chinese town of Dali, Yunnan. It is not amazing stuff but this is a really incredible town right next to a lake with a historic town. Great place to get buzzed.

Thanx for your article, this year is like nothing is found,dont know where I can get some info without the Google service.,i will try my chance here

Very close to the Sumerian account, which also had a list of herbs and domestic animals that were given or developed on-site by the gods. There’s a good chance that the agricultural revolution was focused enough to teach many farmers animal husbandry and botany; the huge breeding programs of the new homo sapiens sapiens and upwards crossbreeds required that the training be pretty thorough to avoid famine.

Hello Duncan, thank you for your comment 🙂

I am not familiar with the Sumerian account, and I would like to know more. Is there a particular source or place that you would recommend for me to start with researching it? I agree with your point about the need for focus in the agricultural revolution also.

With best wishes,

This information is very good and useful. Thank you ! Your site is really great, useful and I learnt a lot of stuff here. Continue with the great job !

I went to Dali back in 1996 and it was like Weed Paradise.

Bought like 5KG of Orange Hair for US$50

It was a good memory

So good to read something that is straight and to the point and not filled with half truths by misinformed minds and political rhetoric by those who don’t care about right or wrong .

It’s interesting article that I can add a little too. I lived in China for 4 years. I can say that there are 3 “legal” PRC state controlled Hemp producers and that almost all of the fibre is for export. The oil is also exclusively for export too. Hemp resin and oil is still very controlled in the PRC and from what I was told, the Chinese people still cannot get products that contain the oil or resin, legally. Yes, that means no hemp body butter or body shop hemp oil…. it seems completely illogical to me! Yes, in Yunnan you do see a lot of Cannabis smokers – but all it takes is one Police officer who holds a grudge against you and you’ll see the inside of a jail cell and have to bribe yourself out or worse – get a long prison term. Over 20 grams of cannabis in your possesion and it’s execution…. plain and simple.

China takes a tough stance on cannabis use and supply. Despite this, it is the largest producer of hemp in the word. Here’s more information.

State of the Industry: CBD Market in China

State of the Industry: CBD Market in China

The Cannabidiol (CBD) market in China has the potential to be a massive industry in the coming years. Despite marijuana being illegal in China, there are some indications that the sale of CBD products will soon become downright common in the future, setting the table for this burgeoning industry to unlock a major market in Greater China.

While the legalization of marijuana products for recreational or even medicinal purposes is not expected any time soon in China, cosmetics containing CBD have been legal in China for dozens of years. And as the central government appears to indicate it might relax its policies towards CBD more generally, and American and global companies begin to receive approval to import CBD cosmetics into China, the potential financial windfall shouldn’t go ignored.

CBD and THC are Highly Different

Often mistakenly considered one and the same, recent efforts across the world have been made to distinguish between tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in China and around the world.

It’s not a mystery why the two are often conflated and lumped into the same category as marijuana. Both substances are found in the flowers of the plant known as cannabis sativa , with its leaves producing CBD only. Despite deriving from the same plant, THC and CBD produce notably different effects, which is why the former is considered a controlled substance banned in China and only recently made legal throughout the world, and latter is deemed acceptable by Chinese authorities.

THC is a psychoactive compound that is often used for recreational (though sometimes medicinal) purposes. It is the ingredient in marijuana that conjures images of lazy teenagers, consuming several bags of chips and being glued to the couch. Is it this perception that has led to governments’ strict approach to THC and — perhaps incorrectly — CBD by extension.

CBD, on the other hand, tends not to produce such a sensation, which is part of the reason why the various use cases of CBD intrigue so many businesses and consumers. CBD is frequently used in topical creams and natural cosmetics, as they are in China. But in different regulatory environments CBD products are used to treat pain, skin irritation, insomnia, and a variety of other conditions. It is even occasionally prescribed to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, as CBD has been found to provide pain relief and stimulate appetite.

CBD Market in China at Present

CBD is not considered a banned narcotic by the Chinese government, unlike marijuana — the possession of which could result in serious criminal consequences. Curiously enough, cultivation of the hemp plant, from which CBD is derived is, in fact, legal in three Chinese provinces: Yunnan, Heilongjiang and Jilin. It is cultivated under strict regulations. As alluded to above, this is because CBD does not intoxicate as does marijuana/THC.

There are historical reasons for social acceptance of CBD in cosmetics and, perhaps one day, for medicinal purposes. Cannabis has been grown and cultivated in China for thousands of years. Hemp plant fibres can be used to manufacture textiles and ropes, while hemp seeds can be consumed or used to produce oil.

According to some ancient texts , cannabis has even been used in the making of traditional Chinese medicine. As with all eastern medicines, the cultivation and utilization of plants, herbs, roots and other harvestable materials had been relied upon for millennia before the first Aspirin was even produced. This inexorable part of Chinese culture bodes well for the acceptability of CBD products in the future — going beyond cosmetics and into more medicinal uses.

CBD Market in China Outlook

Beginning in 2010, the outlook for the CBD market in China became brighter than it had been since the signing of the 1985 United Nations’ Convention on Psychotropic Substances. The industrial production of hemp has grown ever since. The potential economic gains stemming from the export of hemp plants, seeds and oils to foreign markets became too lucrative to ignore.

North American and European countries relaxing their policies on THC and CBD products has created a situation where hemp exports could represent a boon to some of the more rural, impoverished regions of China, and the entire country by extension.

The recent announcement by American company Uncle Bud’s—a hemp and CBD brand that boasts former Los Angeles Lakers star Magic Johnson as its main spokesperson—that it would sell its CBD infused cosmetics via cross-border e-commerce on Tmall Global shows that there may be a wave of Western CBD products being sold throughout Greater China very soon.

Talk to the Experts

As with any foreign brand looking to penetrate the Chinese ecommerce market, the particularities of doing so can be hard to navigate without the support of seasoned professionals who know how to launch major brands in China. And although there is likely an additional regulatory hurdle to be overcome due to the sensitive nature of CBD, finding yourself in the right hands is the first step to take.

Newfound affluence among the upper-middle class has created a situation wherein Chinese consumers are now among the world’s leading consumers of luxury brands and goods, and China’s luxury market is the most lucrative in the world.